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Yas Necati

Why We Need The Istanbul Convention

Author:
istanbul-petition

By Anna Hill

Trigger Warning: sexual violence

The Istanbul Convention is a document that sets out a legal framework to tackling violence against women and girls. It sets minimum standards for the government to meet when tackling this issue and will ensure that governments prevent violence, protect those that experience or could experience that violence and prosecute perpetrators. Many countries have ratified [i.e. accepted into law] the convention already such as: Denmark, France, Italy, Serbia, Spain, Turkey and Albania. To read more check out this page.

I asked fellow PBG writers why we need the Istanbul Convention so badly:

We need the Istanbul Convention because we are simply not doing enough to protect victims of sexual violence, educate the general public on this issue, and punish the perpetrators of such acts. I support the ratification of the Istanbul Convention because as a survivor of child molestation I need support and security I need the assurance that there will be less people like me – less people who suffer from flashbacks and panic attacks due to those events and whose lives are affected by the violence they have faced. – Anon

I could list off a lot of statistics about gender based violence. The fact that 1 in 5 women in the UK will experience sexual assault in her lifetime; that over 20,000 girls under 15 are at risk of female genital mutilation each year; that one incident of domestic violence is reported to the police every minute. I could tell you that 1 in 3 school girls experience unwanted sexual touching; that 85,000 women are raped each year; and that 2 women a week in the UK alone are killed by a current or former partner. The numbers are shocking, and they’re a big part of the reason why we need the Istanbul Convention. But these are not just numbers- behind every number is a person. That Some of these people are people I love, people you love. One of those people is me and it might be you. The fact is that I don’t know a single woman who doesn’t know someone who has suffered from gender-based violence, or is a survivor of it themselves. We need to do something about this. This is why we need the Istanbul Convention. – Yas

The Istanbul Convention was signed by the UK government on 8 June 2012. Since then, the government has supposedly taken steps to facilitate the ratification of the Convention – such as creating legislation on forced marriage and FGM – yet continues to stall fully ratifying the Convention into UK law. Why is the government hesitating in creating a safer country for women across the UK? Every 30 seconds, the police receive a call related to domestic violence. Each year, up to 3 million women experience violence in the UK. In ratifying the Istanbul Convention, the government would be committing to implementing measures to ensure that the UK is a safe place for women. The measures within the Istanbul Convention form a structure under which violence against women would be prevented and women and girls would be protected, with prosecution of violence. It would implement safe spaces and refuges for survivors, allowing women to thrive rather than live in fear. Ratifying the Istanbul Convention in the UK is long overdue – countries such as Italy, Spain and France have already ratified the Convention. We all have the right to a life free of violence and fear. The Istanbul Convention facilitates the measures necessary for this, and its time the UK government responded to its commitment to ratify this. – Amy
Check out the petition, website and twitter for more info and ways to get involved!

Myself as a Man-hater

Author:

By Yas Necati

Someone told me recently that they thought I hated men. They couldn’t provide a reason why, but seemed convinced, somehow, with no evidence, that this was the truth.

So I just thought I’d make it clear here (although if you read my blogs, you probably already know): I do not hate men. I LOVE men. There are a few that I dislike, but there are a few women I dislike. I don’t have a problem with these select few for their gender, rather their principles. It is not men I am against. It is the patriarchy I am against. Male-domination, male-privilege, not men.

If I EVER do ANYTHING that implies that I hate men, please call me out on it. Because I don’t hate men and I don’t want to give that impression. If I’m acting in a way that suggests man-hating then that is not only offensive but it is wrong.

I’m not here to promote gender-bashing, I’m here to promote equality. I’m not here to promote discrimination, I’m here to promote acceptance. I’m not here to promote separation, I’m here to promote cohesion. Most importantly –

I’m not here to spread hate. I’m here to spread love.

Why Madonna is my Shero

Author:

By Yas Necati

madonna!

“Drinking beer and smoking weed in the parking lot of my high school was not my idea of being rebellious, because that’s what everybody did. And I never wanted to do what everybody did. I thought it was cooler to not shave my legs or under my arms. I mean, why did God give us hair there anyways? Why didn’t guys have to shave there? Why was it accepted in Europe but not in America? No one could answer my questions in a satisfactory manner, so I pushed the envelope even further… But it was hard and it was lonely, and I had to dare myself every day to keep going… And I wondered if it was all worth it, but then I would pull myself together and look at a postcard of Frida Kahlo taped to my wall, and the sight of her moustache consoled me.”

Dear Madonna,

A couple years ago, when I was in school, I posted a picture of my hairy armpit on Facebook to prove that people would react and that sexism still existed. I posted this picture after reading the exact words of yours quoted above. I believed it was the right thing to do, but just like you “I wondered if it was all worth it.” Just like you, I found it “hard” and “lonely.” But then I thought, heck, if Madonna can do it, then so can I! Why should I be scared when one of the bravest women in the entire world was behind me?

But the truth is, Madonna, it’s sad that you’re considered brave for doing this. It’s upsetting that something as simple as showing the natural female body is actually “brave” in our society today. And if it’s a bold move for one of the most famous and influential women in the world to make, then how terrifying must it be for other women? Everyday women? Women who know that they don’t have tens of thousands of people behind them who will respect and support them no matter what?

In high school you were on you own, but you had Frida Kahlo. I was on my own, but I had you. And hopefully, if young women of the future ever feel alone, they’ll have you, me, and a whole feminist movement behind them.

Thank you for standing up for what’s right as a woman who’s never been afraid to defy the crowd. It’s increasingly difficult in a society with a narrow-minded, arrogant and oppressive media. Thank you for implying that women should have a choice when that media tries to box us into ideals and force us into silence and submission. Thank you for speaking up and out. You give hope and power to a future generation. And hopefully, in the future, thanks to our collective “brave” actions, hair in natural places might not actually be considered brave at all.

In solidarity,

A fan and a sister x

Ellen Page – LGBTQ+ Superwoman!

Author:

ellenpage

By Yas Necati

“And I am here today because I am gay,” she said, with no sense of triumph or glory. It was just a fact. It was just a part of her identity, and I salute Ellen Page for simply stating her sexual orientation like it was no big deal. Because it shouldn’t be a big deal. Ellen’s ‘coming out’ wasn’t flamboyant or dramatic, it was simple and honest. In that moment she gave us a glimpse into what the future will hopefully be like for LGBTQ+ youth. A future in which people could say they are gay just as easily as anyone else could say they were straight.

Ellen, I am writing this post because I am gay. Pansexual, to be precise. I’m far from heteronormative. Today I bought my first lesbian lifestyle magazine. Inspired by your speech, I marched into Foyles, picked up a copy of “Diva” and took it home. I wasn’t ashamed to pay for it at the till and I wasn’t even ashamed when reading it whilst waiting for my pumpkin Korroke (recommended!) in Yo! Sushi.

As you said in your speech at the Human Rights Campaign’s ‘Time to Thrive’ Conference, “There is courage all around us.” I see courage every day and I’m inspired by it. I hope, with tiny steps towards accepting who I am, I can harness that courage as well.

Thank you Ellen Page. You’ve inspired me to go out and make a change in my life today. You’ve inspired me to be strong and brave and face up to something I never would’ve had the guts to do before. I was not ashamed. You’ve inspired one young woman to buy one magazine and move towards accepting herself… and I’m sure you’ve inspired thousands more. You’re an absolute icon and the fact that you have been honest about who you are will hopefully inspire other young women to do the same. So thank you for that. You’re truly admirable.

Here are a few highlights of Ellen Page’s speech. Please listen to it in full on Youtube. It’s one of the most beautiful and heartfelt things you will ever hear.

“There are pervasive stereotypes about masculinity and femininity that define how we’re all supposed to act, dress and speak and they serve no one.”

“The simple fact is this world would be a whole lot better if we just made an effort to be less horrible to one another.”

“If we took just 5 minutes to recognise each other’s beauty, instead of attacking each other for our differences, that’s not hard. It’s really an easier and better way to live, and ultimately, it saves lives.”

“We deserve to experience love fully, equally, without shame and without compromise.”

 

New Year’s Resolutions of an Uppity Feminist

Author:

By Yas Necati

How does the new year shape up for a bra-burning, man-hating, sex-loathing feminist? I give you… New Year’s Resolutions of a Women’s Rights Activist:

1. Burn my bra. In fact, burn all my bras. Bras are obviously the main source of my oppression and most dominant factor of a patriarchal society.

2. Burn everyone else’s bras. As bras are so blatantly the source of all evil, I will start on mine, then burn every other bra in the world, to finally achieve an egalitarian society.

3. Burn everything I own that is vaguely feminine. Femininity is a product of the patriarchy so I will seek to abolish it… then again, so is masculinity… let’s disallow both in all sexes!

4. Never again interfere with a single hair on my body. I will grow out ALL my bodily hair, and wherever possible, tie it into plaits.

5. Hate all men. Well this one’s a given. ALL men are the same, clones dominating over us, restricting our womanliness. I will not make contact with a single man in the new year.

6. Refuse to enter another heterosexual relationship… and purge myself of previous ones. Sleeping with the enemy is wrong! Making any contact with the enemy is wrong! I will avoid any intimacy with our enemies in the new year.

7. Become a sex-hating prude. In fact, I will refrain from all relationships. I despise sexualisation in mainstream culture… so I will now simply hate all sex and everything sexual.

8. Lock myself in my room and avoid any further contact with the outside world. As a man-hating, bra-burning, professional anti-sex feminist, I do not wish to have any exposure to the patriarchy. Considering that everything is patriarchal, even the trees, I will never leave the house again and absorb myself in feminist tumblr pages. I will only emerge from this sanctuary rarely, to intimidate innocent men on Twitter and restrict men’s freedom and rights by hurling abuse at them from my window.

Just a note that this post is satire, for any who might be in doubt! If you’d like to read my actual New Year’s Resolutions, please click here. Have a great new year, from all the team at PBG! :-)

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