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Alice and Anna Discuss Make Up

Author:

By Alice Koski and Anna Hill

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For many women, make up is a normal part of everyday life; in fact, the average woman in the UK wears make up for 341 day of the year. And whilst make up certainly seems like a positive force – for giving women confidence, for being an art, for giving us control over our image – it is definitely not without its problems. The double standards it creates, the pressure it puts on women to look perfect, the industry itself… to name just a few.

With this in mind, we’re tackling the subject of make up by answering and discussing the following five questions together. Here we go!

How were you introduced to make up? When did you start wearing it?

Alice – I was a complete tomboy from the ages of about 7 to 12, and had never wanted anything to do with makeup. It wasn’t until my second year of secondary school that I started to take an interest. My introduction to make up began with a cheap eyeliner from Boots, my mum’s old mascara and a lot of mistakes! Myself and my friends bonded over make up – there were many experiments and many disasters (I’m remembering like the time a fake eyelash got stuck on my real ones!). Make up was one of the things we learnt about together and I definitely count it as a good (bar the false eyelash incident!) experience.

Anna – That’s really cool! I had a similar experience, particularly with the whole tomboy thing at the beginning, and then in Year Seven when I changed friendship groups and I “got into” make up. It was fine, although I think I went with it more to fit in than because I actually enjoyed wearing it, and I still have no real understanding of make up so maybe that’s why. I also actually remember being sort of bullied by these girls who wanted to give me a “makeover” and then tried to make me look like a panda, and I didn’t know how to take it off, so I felt really humiliated. Luckily my now best friend helped me to get it off, but after that I stopped hanging out with them or wearing much make up.

Alice – That sounds awful! Year 7 is a weird time because it’s such a big transition.

Anna – Year seven 7 was a very very tough year for me! I think it must have scared me off make up, but I’m actually pretty comfortable with being a total rookie at it now.

Alice – I can’t remember whether I was genuinely interested in discovering make up or whether I felt like I should be interested.

Anna- I think a lot of girls feel like that! Maybe that’s why we all turn to make up, as a way of coping with the change and the new “grownupness”.

Alice – That’s a really interesting idea. I remember that same sort of time being pretty tough because of having to cope with all the ‘growing up’.

Anna – It makes me wanna ask everyone when they got into makeup to see if it was around the same time. Growing up as a girl is so hard! You’re thrown in at the deep end – expected to be really good at make up immediately and to have a great fashion sense.

Alice – Yes! And it’s all at once – that 12-14 age range. Quite a lot to cope with.

What is your daily make up routine if you have one?

Anna – I don’t really have a daily or conventional make up routine. I actually own very little make up, BUT I do have a kind of self-care routine that involves putting on make up. It’s a little bit bizarre I suppose but I like to view this routine as a kind of therapy! Basically, when I feel really sad, or just sort of lost, or any negative emotion, or creatively sapped, I paint my face with lipstick and/or use turquoise eyeliner to make myself have freckles and experiment with contouring and bizarre shapes and strange lip colours. anna1It’s really fun and it helps me to survive really awful weeks, or it can just be a way to remind myself that my body is my own and I can do with it what I want – it doesn’t have to look pretty or cute – it can be ugly, weird, eye-catching, sparkling, childish, alien, robotic, butch, magical and any number of other things. So my “make up routine” is a really intense one and only happens about once a month. It’s really refreshing and I would 800% recommend it! Just throw caution (and colour) to the wind and put stuff onto your face!

Alice – That’s really cool! Sometimes I forget that make up can be arty. Some would say it’s a form of art!

Anna – I’m not sure if it is or isn’t really, but I don’t mind – it’s purpose for me isn’t art ,it’s just a way of helping me access strength or confidence or happiness. But then I think selfies can be art, so if I take a selfie with the makeup maybe I’ve made it INTO some kind of art piece?

Alice – Yeah, why not? There should be a gallery set up for selfies!

Anna – I would so go to that!! And hope my selfies made it in! What about you? What’s your kind of routine with makeup?

Alice -– My routine is nowhere near as interesting as yours! I don’t own a lot of make up and I tend to keep things quite simple. But I’ve developed a make up routine in the order that I apply things – concealer first, then foundation, then eyebrows, then eyes, then lips. I like doing my eyes best, and I’m a fan of big eyeliner flicks! If I want to keep things more casual, I’ll not put as much on, but if I’m going somewhere where I want to impress, I’ll do more.

Anna – Oh that’s interesting! So if you are dressing to impress do you wear more obvious make up rather than natural- looking stuff?

Alice – Yeah, like if I’m going to a party, I’ll put on lots of eyeliner and probably lipstick, but if I’m meeting friends in the day or going to school I won’t bother.

Anna – This might sound a bit like a therapy question, but do you enjoy putting the makeup on? Like is it a nice part of your day?

Alice – I kinda do actually, especially if I’m with a friend and we’re going somewhere, it’s fun to share make up and help each other. I also quite like seeing the ‘transformation’ of it too.

Anna – Yeah! A mutual and often girly shared experience. And watching your face change, it’s cool. It’s pretty impressive what people who can do make up can do – like contouring is so impressive.

Alice – Exactly! I’ve never tried it but it’s pretty amazing how people can completely change the shape of their face!

Anna – I think this type of stuff is seriously underrated because it is considered girly, and girly ALWAYS equals vapid, stupid, bad, pointless.

Alice – I’ve also seen lot of guys saying that girls who wear make up are ‘lying’ to everyone, which pisses me off.

Anna – I think though they react like that because they don’t really understand makeup – not to be patronising.

Alice – They set a double standard as well by saying that girls who wear make up are fake/liars, but girls who don’t are ugly/aren’t making any effort!

Anna – I think that’s why it’s just important to really think about WHO you are wearing makeup for. It’s okay to want to look pretty and impress people, but make sure that YOU think you look pretty.

Why do you/don’t you wear make up?

Alice – I wear make up most days, as I’m either going to school/university or seeing friends. There are a lot of reasons why I do this, the main one being that make up makes me feel more confident in myself, and that gives me a boost. Another reason is that, after having worn make up for a few years now, it feels almost like a necessity. If I go out ‘bare-faced’ I feel a bit naked. I would never judge another girl for not wearing make up, but there is a certain standard I set for myself – if I’m going to be seeing certain people or if I’m going somewhere where I know I’ll get my photo taken, then I feel like I should wear make up.

Anna – That’s really interesting because I go out bare faced the majority of the time, but I do USE makeup in a similar way to you – sometimes I wear it to feel confident. I’m much less interested in looking pretty than I used to be. Now I care about looking like myself, being feminine, being interesting, being confident through the makeup I use. I also really like TRYING to look ugly – it’s so much fun and it takes all the pressure off!

Alice – These ‘expectations’ that I have for myself cause me to feel like I need to wear make up, but if I stopped wearing make up, what’s the worst thing that could happen!? Your attitude is great though, I definitely feel like I have to try and look pretty. Trying to look ugly is not something that’s ever crossed my mind!

Anna – Unfortunately it does take a lot of strength to shun those expectations, so you know, baby steps – not to be patronising! It’s fun, you should definitely try it some time.

Do you feel different when wearing makeup or more judged by others?

Anna – I do feel different! I think part of that is because it’s quite rare for me to wear makeup and because of various issues with my skin I’ve never felt comfortable putting on make up, so when I wear makeup I wear MAKE UP (with flashing lights and bold colours), rather than the: “I woke up like this with a flawless face and most men can’t tell that I am wearing makeup at all” look”. So I guess I must get judged by people who think I dress/am alive to please them, BUT I do not care for that. I enjoy confusing people though, for example once I sat on the tube and I had some turquoise freckles for confidence and strength and also fun (I was going to a Beyonce concert!!!), and these two guys opposite me were clearly SO CONFUSED by it all. I enjoyed screwing with their perceptions. I think I like doing that sort of thing because of my identity too – as a Queer person I often feel like media only represents me when it subverts what is seen as “normal,” so now I claim subversion as my “thing.” anna2I’ve also gotten used to people judging my “look” because I have body hair which I don’t really cover up (leg hair is so effective at keeping me warm in the winter!), so I like to play with those stereotypes when I wear make up too – i.e if you don’t shave you are dirty and lazy, but then if I don’t shave and look really well put together, I’m proving them wrong and hopefully making them question those judgments.

To get back to the question properly, I do often wear makeup and it makes me feel feminine and powerful which I like. The red lipstick I wear sometimes is so full of obviousness and vivacity so that’s great for confidence and making me feel unashamed to be here, to be taking up space.

Alice – Wow, super interesting. My response is that I suppose I feel a bit of both. Different, because make up makes me feel confident, more attractive, and more powerful like you said! But on the flip side, I do often feel judged for my make up choices. If I go without make up, I feel like people (especially girls) may judge me to be lazy or not making an effort. However, when I do wear make up, although it makes me feel confident, I feel like people make assumptions about me too. In particular, I’ve often encountered guys who see me wearing make up, ‘fashionable clothes’ (and not to mention I have the ‘dumb blonde’ stereotype to live up to) and judge me to be ditzy/vapid/slutty, which is not true, and something I wouldn’t want to pin onto any girl.

Anna – No! It sucks. It’s basically like anything a teenage girl does is stupid. It’s one of those things that is SO difficult to sort out, because you don’t need to spend your life trying to show them how complicated and clever you are – and it’s not your job to educate them, but those stereotypes can be really harmful and REALLY hurt girls’ self esteem.

Has make up helped you, and if so how?

Alice – I feel like make up has helped me – with my confidence, with making friends, with growing up. But when I think about it – I didn’t need make up for any of those things. I’ve always enjoyed doing my make up and I enjoy wearing it, but I can’t tell if it’s for the right reasons.

Anna – This one is difficult. I think agree, but because I basically like to paint my face a lot, it’s helped me personally –  but I’m not using it in the same way that most women do.

Alice – I can’t really justify that make up HELPS women. Maybe it does at surface level, but on a deeper level I think it’s maybe quite a damaging thing. I don’t know!

Anna- I guess it’s not the actual ACT of putting on make up, it’s the context of our situation. The kyriarchy/the patriarchy MAKE make up problematic, but the activity itself isn’t really a problem at all. It’s difficult because I never want to be the type of person to be like “women you cannot do a thing you like to do,”  but there are definitely issues with make up and it can quite easily be used as a tool to manipulate and subjugate women. Which is not cool.

Alice- Totally agree… maybe it’s not that we stop using it, it’s that we change our attitudes towards it?

If make up is a problem, can it be solved? Is it more of a bad thing than a good thing? Can we change attitudes and prejudices towards it? We feel almost more confused now than we did before our discussion! However, hearing about each other’s experiences and points of view was both interesting and enlightening. We encourage you to have your own discussions about make up with friends (you can use the questions from here if you like!). We guarantee you’ll come out of it a little confused and a little enlightened…and if anyone comes to any definite conclusions, let us know!

Youtube and Sexual Abuse

Author:

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By Anna Hill

Recently, I have noticed certain disgusting behaviour of some prominent and successful male Youtubers has come out of the woodwork of the Internet.  The whole situation has been handled badly, and honestly I, along with many others, am very upset about it. As a part of the Youtube community (as both a Fangirl – or a consumer of media – and a content creator), I believe it is our job – those who are part of the website – to continue to talk about this and ensure that it never happens again. The pervasive abuse from “Youtube celebrities” is not being tackled properly, and this is a huge issue because it means that many are completely unaware of the situation, therefore continue to support the abusers’ content.

One of the reasons this is all so scary is because people aren’t speaking up. I’ve seen just one video explicitly naming those that should not be endorsed in any shape or form, instead of watching, and thus supporting their work, read up on the master post of all of the abusers and the victim’s stories: http://unpleasantmyles.tumblr.com/post/79455706244/tom-milsom-hexachordal-heres-the-post-olga although obviously some trigger warnings apply (such as emotional manipulation, rape, sexual abuse)) which is infinitely important, but that was the only video. We must be vigilant and open and ensure everyone is educated to make the right decisions about the content they watch and which they therefore support. (here’s the explicit video by Lindsay or Pottermoosh: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pAQDoLeNIk )

It’s also a huge issue because those who are mostly in danger of being preyed upon by older, emotionally manipulative men are the large demographic of 13-17 year old girls that use the website. These are the same girls that we are continually told are “ruining” Youtube due to their fangirlishness when they are actually the ones who are most vulnerable and most in danger.

Frighteningly, one of the main culprits of some hideous behaviour, Ed Blann (Edplant on youtube), tried to come back to Youtube after having a three-month break and then attempted to claim it was all a mistake and people should forgive him. If this sounds like I am being too cruel to him, then let me explain:

  • Abusers need to accept that sometimes they cannot be forgiven.
  • Going back to a platform, which you used to abuse and even rape girls, is not the way to prove how much of a changed man you are.
  • You can’t treat this situation as if the benefit of the victims’ suffering is that you learned something and are a better person. That is not good enough and that’s not a solution.
  • We cannot trust abusers.

In the case of Ed Blann, whose come back video (a song supposedly explaining how much of a changed man he was) was well received by all too many people, he continued to prove that he does not deserve the ears or eyes of all the wonderful women who watch him by deleting actual comments from the main woman who he abused about her feelings towards his return (see here: http://that-teen-witch.tumblr.com/post/88175226722/lions-and-snails-i-commented-on-eds-video ).

Ann, or TheGeekyBlonde, is a fantastic Youtuber and has made a great video about the situation and how we can deal with it and move forward. She outlines some of the ways we can help combat and move on from this experience:

  1. Amputate – This means we have to cut abusers out of EVERYTHING, we cannot allow them to turn up to events/be on Youtube/etc. etc. No endorsement and no publicity
  2. Vaccinate – TELL EVERYONE ABOUT IT. Write blog posts/ have discussions, let the community know and make sure the community knows that behaviour won’t be tolerated. Stand with victims.
  3. Elevate – Value the work of women and teenagers rather than phasing out or neglecting their work! Big up women, and women on Youtube. Listen to them, believe them, support them.
  4. Exfoliate – This is about responding to irl/online creepiness: do NOT do nothing: stop them, talk to them, confront them. If you are too scared to talk to those that are being abusive or dodgy try to help the victim, ask them if they need help, compliment their shoes. Just try to give them a way out of talking to them or engaging with them.

Ann’s Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Uc5eNNG60o

Consent videos are all very well but the viewers don’t need consent videos, the prominent Youtubers who suck do! There have been about four videos defining consent (which is important and useful, don’t get me wrong) but it is not enough – we need real change. A recent example of a consent video falling short is Jack and Dean’s (or omfgitsjackanddean) consent song which ultimately does nothing to rectify the situation, although many celebrate them as being really great people, even when they describe the sexual abuse as a “hullabaloo” and refuse to say that the song was a response to the behaviour of Youtubers.

If you’re aware of Youtube then you’ll be aware of the Vlogbrothers, Hank and John Green. Their position as de facto leaders of the Youtube community (through their creation of events like Vidcon) means their lack of a real stance and inadequate to no discussion of the situation is reprehensible.  Such behaviour, or lack of any real analysis or response makes them somewhat complicit in the actions of the youtubers that are abusers. (John Green even went as far as welcoming Ed Blann back to twitter after the allegations came out! http://i-burn-i-pine-i-perish.tumblr.com/post/89193450074/eddplant-returned-to-twitter-back-in-february-and-john). The lack of support that John and Hank Green gave to survivors means that not only do a large portion of viewers know absolutely nothing about this, but that they have let down a large percentage of the community – their failure to speak up has meant that this community no longer seems to listen to or care about the very people that allow it and, by association, them to have so much power.

If you are not protecting women and girls from this kind of treatment then you are allowing it to happen. No public discourse, no actual change.

 

gender//queer// free

Author:

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By Anna Hill

My name is Anna, my sexuality is Queer and my gender is Genderqueer. I like they/them pronouns and she/her ones too. It’s lovely to meet you.

Because there are a lot of definitions of the above words, I only recently discovered I was. And, as I think particularly for us gqs (genderqueers), visibility is really important. So, I wanted to share with you some of my thoughts and feelings about my gender and sexual orientation (And to reassure anyone else who feels similarly!).

I found “Queer” before I found “Genderqueer”, and when I think about why I love the word so much it’s because to me queer is free. This is an example of where definitions can actually be beneficial to lots of things: to self esteem, friendships, love affairs and confidence. I realized this about six months ago.

Since then, I’ve got my LGBTQ+ pride on and have enjoyed all sorts of wonderful things (such as rainbows and many great books about all the letters!!). I’ve found some wonderful queer people on Tumblr and have also kept some of my very wonderful, supportive friends. It’s been a lovely experience! (Unfortunately I am lucky in the context of the way queers are treated in the world).

I found this quote that summed it up for me: “Not like Queer as in gay. Queer like escaping definition” -Brandon Went

The obvious thing that I haven’t specifically talked about is the actual sex part of the “queer is my sexuality” thing. Personally, I define Queer as not straight, and although I dislike defining non-hegemonic ideas, concepts, genders or sexualities from what they are not, for the purpose of clarity this is easier. This can manifest in a lot of ways: being queer is being bisexual, is being gay, is being pansexual; it’s pretty much being whatever you like. Being queer is also about reclaiming loving yourself and not only WHO you love, but HOW you love, too – being Queer is challenging and futuristic and it does not coexist peacefully with the silly old fashioned, dusty gender binary.

More recently, I have uncovered my genderqueerness (now I sound like a gender detective, which isn’t something you should be! Respect people and respect their pronouns, whether they are kitten, her, xe, nym or muffin-top-potato). My questioning snowballed from Queer really, and this incredible exhibition called Most Important Ugly (http://arabellesicardi.com/tagged/most-important-ugly), which showcases beauty/ugliness from a wide range of people who ultimately define as a whole bunch of different and similar genders. It opened my eyes to possibilities in many of the interviews I read and it also presented me with the ability and exciting prospect of further exploring my own gender identity. This is something that I then did. I thus, I discovered how freeing (are you noticing a pattern here??) they/them pronouns were, and how they seemed to fit me on some days.

I found the word Enby (which is from the words non-binary, and are the equivalent of boy/girl), which I think is not only a cute word, but also very useful. Enby, or non-binary people are basically those that do not fit into the constructs we have of “boy/man” and “girl/woman”. They are outside that binary, and are a “third gender”, or a on a spectrum somewhere, or simply floating around in space (which is how I often feel). Non-Binary though, can also be a mix of all those feelings in one person at one time, or a combination of feeling like a boy sometimes and like out of that gender sometimes too. I am Enby, and I am happy to be. It has been quite confusing and complicated at times, because I felt a little lost, and had hardly any experience or anyone to talk to about it. But with a little help from my Tumblr friends, I pulled through and I feel happier and hazier and freer than ever.

Now I do still struggle sometimes and it can be confusing for me – for example some days I feel pretty certain I am a girl and I want she/hers please, and then some days were I continually question myself, like What am I? Shall I introduce myself with they/them pronouns? Why is this sooo confusing??!

But then I remember; my gender is important and unimportant. I am me, and ultimately that’s all I really need to survive. If you are still confused here: Sometimes I am a girl, sometimes I am not a girl. I am not a boy though, just a not-quite-really-at-all-in-the-middle-but-kinda-floating-about-on-a-cloud-of-chocolate-and-glitter Enby person.

Are we clear??

Non-Sexist, Totally Fantastic Summer Book Recommendations

Author:

By Anna Hill

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In light of Sophia’s great post about the dire, repetitive sexism that is often prevalent in so-called “summer reads”, we decided in response that the rest of the PBG team would collect some of our own favourite summer reads and share them with you! Now we can all be huge nerds together and fall in love with some great books this summer! As it is sometimes harder to find alternative and less problematic books, we to put together our fave reads in a list for your enjoyment! If you want to know why we might have chosen them (some may not be as conventionally “summery” and “light” as other recommended reads in mainstream media), then it’s due to a range of reasons. These books are any/all/some/one/none of the following: empowering, liberating, moving, thought-provoking, stereotype smashing, thrilling, enthralling, exciting, enjoyable.

Without further adieu, here is PBG’s list of non-sexist, totally fantastic summer book recommendations:

Beauty Queens by Libba Bray

This is a magnificent YA book and it’s so unbelievably good, it waayyyy passes the Bechdel test and it has mostly female characters who are kickass and freaking incredible. Basically a bunch of Beauty Queens crash land on an island and have to survive!! There are Queer characters, a trans girl, some really fab women of colour. Some really annoying tropes/stereotypes of women are utterly subverted and it’s just great, and it’s so aware of it all as well, it’s a clever satire. I think about it a LOT. Lastly it’s good for summer reading because it’s set on a desert island so it’s really HOT (and you know, summer is hot….. just go read this ok).

Every Day by David Levithan

This is a beautiful beautiful book. The story is a romance, so if you like to read love stories then this would be fab for you, it is also a beautifully written book, and it contains such wonderful moments that you will fall in love with all of it over and over again, every sentence. The story is slightly strange but very clever, it follows the story of “A” an entity or person that has no proper physical form – every day they wake up in another’s body. And one day they meet Rhiannon! (who obvs they fall in love with!) It’s also great because it discusses ideas about gender and sexuality and the fluidness of those ideas/constructs/concepts.

Saga by Brian Vaughan and Fiona Staples

This is a comic book series, and there are three volumes out so far and I am ITCHING for the next instalment, because SO MUCH DRAMA AND ACTION AND EXCITEMENT! The story is a war story and a love/family journey too – it follows a couple who fall in love but are on the opposite sides of the ongoing war that just keeps killing and hurting, and they have a baby. They then have to try to survive. It’s got a kickass female lead, as well as my personal favourite, an amazing bisexual woman named Gwendolyn who is so stylish and lethal. As well as this the relationship between Marko and Alana – the two who are in love, is very sweet and realistic, and the art is really really beautiful too. It’s so enthralling and interesting and beautiful and funny and silly and the characters are A+ (There are some really cute gay, green journalists!). I would also definitely recommend this to people who are new to comics (I’m a newbie myself) as it’s super easy to read/see and get into.

— Anna

The Forest of Hands and Teeth by Carrie Ryan

The Forest of Hands and Teeth is basically a book set post-zombie apocalypse in this tiny village surrounded by the undead, or “unconsecrated.” It’s super religious and they’re basically told that they are the last humans left in the entire world, they’re God’s village. All the men are told to guard the fences and the women must all marry and have lots of babies because their survival depends on it. The protagonist, Mary, basically questions everything and sees past the lies, and she wants to be with a different guy to the one chosen for her because of love, not “duty.” When they’re pushed into the forest she is literally the most determined person and she realises her dream to find the ocean is the most important thing to her, and just being with this dude who she loves isn’t enough. And I won’t say much more but it’s so good.

Sing You Home

This a brilliantly well-crafted novel that outlines some very important issues that same-sex couples are unjustly forced to face. It is about: a woman named Zoe who fails to have a child multiple times and then gives up her hopes of ever being a mother. Her husband then decides to leave and her world is shattered. Luckily for Zoe, she finds a friend in her colleague Vanessa and the more time the two spend together, the better she feels. Zoe then discovers that she wants to spend more and more time with her new friend… until she realizes that what she really wants is something much more than friendship.

With a convincing and believable plot, and characters that you just want to hug (!), the book is a definite must-read. Picoult’s writing is compelling, moving and thoroughly thought provoking. Both Zoe and Vanessa are two of the strongest, bravest and most wonderful women I have ever encountered in literature. They both have a courage and defiance that lifts them above their struggles. Two thoroughly determined, tough and intelligent women (and they don’t rely on men either!).

— Yas

Forbidden Lessons in a Kabul Guesthouse by Suraya Sadeed

This book isn’t fiction, it is a memoir, but the writer has done incredible things, and it is an astonishing read. It is painful and sad to read at many points, as she describes experiences in the heart of a terrible war, seeing extreme poverty, and a kind of inequality that we in the West cannot ever truly imagine. Despite all this, it is immensely hopeful and inspiring, as Suraya Sadeed tells readers of the aid she brought to Afghan communities, and of how hard she fought to do so. She is truly admirable, and a reminder that we can make a difference, if determined enough, as resolve is a powerful trait in people.

— Sophia

The House of Bernarda Alba by Lorca

This recommendation is not exactly up everyone’s street! All the speaking characters are women (only one male character). It has been described as a photographic documentary of 1920’s Spain. Simply, there are five daughters who are in 8 years mourning after the death of their father but one gets engaged and problems follow. The text provides a wonderful insight into 1920s rural Spain and it’s attitudes towards women. Some have more power than others but in the end do they really have any power? Clever symbolism and stylistic techniques highlight the key themes of freedom and repression in a tragic tale of a family of women in mourning. Despite being set almost a century ago parallels can still be found in aspects of today’s society. Great play to help you question the things we see in our world today and what it was like to live as a woman in this society. Original language or a good translation is best (there is also an incredibly accurate English film starring Glenda Jackson).

— Chloe

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre is an absolute classic that follows the life of Jane, from when she is a little girl dealing with cruelty and hardship to when she grows into an independent and intelligent woman. It’s a great feminist book because it was written by a woman and is about a woman at a time when society completely dismissed the idea of women being able to think/act for themselves.

Diary of Anne Frank

Also a classic! This book is both inspiring and also very sad. The diary was written by Anne Frank whilst she was in hiding during WW2 because she was Jewish. Anne inspires me because of her bravery and her honesty – I think her voice really speaks out to all women and girls.

Stargirl by Jerry Spinelli

Stargirl is about a girl who’s not afraid to be different and true to herself, it’s very heartwarming and tells girls that it’s ok not to fit in with the crowd!! (It might be for slightly younger readers)

— Alice

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn

If you haven’t read A Tree Grows in Brooklyn I would highly recommend it, it’s an oldy but a goody. The book follows a girl’s life and family living in Brooklyn. Her family were Irish immigrates and very poor and they lived there during the time where that’s where immigrants would stay. It follows her becoming a woman, and it talks about the dynamics of her mother and father’s relationship. It’s spans over her life starting when she was about 8 and ending in her early 20s. It’s very well written although a tad slow in the beginning, you need to hold on until you get like 1/4 of the way through and it gets super good.

The Witching Hour by Anne Rice

The Witching Hour by Anne Rice is very good, though over 900 pages if you’re looking for a longer read. The plot sounds weird but I promise if you get into it it’s so so good. The novel is about a family of witches that are all strikingly beautiful. It’s set in more modern times when they’re trying to figure out who the next witch is. It describes the history of the family line of witches throughout the book but its main focus is explaining what makes the most recent #1 witch unusually powerful. Of course there is some romance and such but the storyline is deeply complicated and very interesting. I don’t wanna say much more because it’s easy to give things away, just don’t read it if you’re squeamish about sexual themes, it’s an adult novel and I normally have to warn people beforehand because the book can get slightly graphic at times. Again it starts a bit slow and can be a tad confusing at times but I would highly recommend this book to everyone, even if you aren’t into fantasy

— Gracelyn

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini

A follow up to the highly acclaimed novel ‘The Kite Runner’, the book transports us into the life of Mariam, a young Afghan girl who is facing the daily struggle of living in a society that values women solely for their ability to reproduce. Though not light reading, Hossieni’s ability to make the harshest of abuse and discrimination readable subject matter is incredible, providing very valuable insight into the harsh lives of women in Afghanistan and beyond.

— Cora

Bedpans and Bobby Socks by Barbara Fox and Gwenda Gofton

Bedpans and Bobby Socks is set in the late 50’s. It’s about 5 British nurses who move to America to work for a while then go travelling in an old car all over the States. It’s a really fun summer read, especially if you like travel and roadtrip books, and the 5 nurses are all amazingly independent, adventurous women (it’s based on a true story, too!).

— Amy

Now go forth and READ!!!

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