Looking for Something?
Posts Tagged for

Equality

Today we march

Author:
30858102661_32e7e1c39f_k

By Isla Whateley

Content note: Donald Trump, mentions of sexual assault, rape, incest and abortion

Today, women from all over the world will unite in a march of solidarity, in order to prove just how important women’s rights are and to prove to the new Trump administration that they cannot ignore us. The main march is in Washington DC, but many other cities across the world are hosting their own marches on US embassies and consulates. You can find a march near you here!

The Trump administration looms upon us after his inauguration yesterday as President of the United States of America, also known as the most powerful person on Earth. He is known for his racist, xenophobic, sexist and homophobic views and many have been dreading this day since his election in November, including myself and everyone else I know.

As a young woman living in Scotland, you might ask why I’m so worried about Donald Trump. I don’t live in America and I won’t be directly affected by his Presidency. But the USA is the UK’s closest ally, and with the rise of nationalism in both nations (shout out to Brexit), we are likely to be affected more than we realise. Not to mention that the USA is the most powerful and influential country in the world.

Trump’s record on women’s rights is dire. Like many Republicans he is pro-life – or as I prefer to call it, anti-choice – with regards to abortion. He wants to completely ban abortion, with exceptions only in cases of rape, incest or danger to the mother’s life. He hates the idea that Planned Parenthood is government-funded, and basically wants women to lose the majority of our reproductive rights. He has repeatedly objectified women publically and on camera, and has been taken to court for rape and sexual assault before. Many of his cabinet members share these kinds of sexist and outdated views, which is why this march is so important.

The Women’s March this weekend signifies a sort of peaceful solidarity, uniting against fascism and conservative views that hinder women’s lives. It may be the calm before the storm, but maybe we just need to fight harder for our rights in the wake of the storm.

An Interview With Eva O’Flynn

Author:
10593029_815815108439019_3082685626983810100_n

By Anna Hill

I was really inspired by a speech that Eva made at a no more page 3 protest (the full text of which you can read here), where she talked about how the campaign had given her a voice, and empowered her to act, not just for NMP3 but for other important issues too! In response I thought I would interview some of the voices that are important, honest, hard working and inspiring in current UK Teen Girl activism. Who better to start with than Eva herself?! (more…)

Why Are We So afraid of the F-Word?

Author:
By Gemma Garner
‘I think men and women should be treated equally… but I’m not a feminist!’
At the ripe age of 14, I liked to seem controversial, smart and in the know. ‘I don’t get feminists,’ I’d say ‘why not just be a humanist?’. Of course, I was blissfully unaware that humanism was already, in fact, a thing. Still, I’d feel quite satisfied with myself and my new word, and continue on with my day, making sexist, racist, and homophobic remarks in order to fit in. Because I was a ‘humanist’, of course.
In the 4 years it took me to truly understand what feminism is about, I came across people who were on the same journey as me. And yet, no matter how far they got in understanding the injustices women face on a regular basis in our society, they still struggled to really cross the finish line and gladly call themselves ‘a feminist’.
What does this mean? Mostly good things, actually. The majority of young women are beginning to take the time to understand their rights and have a voice, have independence, and speak up. Despite their hesitance to label themselves as a dreaded ‘feminist’, I still find myself overcome with joy when I see women everywhere take a stand and defend women worldwide. There’s hope!
I’ve heard many, many reasons as to why women and men can’t be associated with feminism. It still shocks me when I see women in the spotlight further create misconceptions about feminism… whilst still being incredible role models. Shailene Woodley, for example, is a very powerful, independent, confident woman, who’s taken a stand for women everywhere with her own little (undeclared) forms of activism. She proves that beauty does not have to be accentuated with makeup, by baring her makeup-less face on the red carpet on a regular basis. But still she insists that she is not a feminist, because she ‘loves men’ and thinks we ‘need balance’. Oh, Shailene. What you’re thinking of is misandry, not feminism. By believing in equality you aren’t required to hate men, or to believe women should be the superior gender… that’s an entirely different matter.
I know feminism can be complex, and not all feminists have the same opinion on certain things, but that doesn’t mean you can’t be a feminist you’re proud of. So, to all out there who believe in equality, even those who insist they aren’t a feminist (I’m talking to you, Shailene), I give you this, the ‘Am I the F word?’ quiz. You’re welcome.
Feminism_Quiz

Women in Film

Author:

women in film infographic

Emily Zhang

21st Century Fox, the large film corporation, is launching a mentorship program for women directors. This is incredibly exciting news, because Hollywood has a historically disproportionate number of women working in the executive departments of film.

Less than five percent of directors are women. The film industry (on a large scale) seems ridiculously unwelcoming to people who aren’t men. That makes me apprehensive and angry, because it means that there is a severe lack of diverse perspective, often leading to blatant objectification of women in movies. There’s the feeling that film isn’t for “everyone,” in the production or the viewing of it, and that we are forced to accept one “mold” of the female character in which there’s little complexity and much misrepresentation. (Maybe this is also a tangent, but what annoys me most is when women who are not young or skinny or “societally attractive” have their appearances used as punchlines in comedies).

But then something wonderful happened in response. The Twitter hashtag #hirethesewomen was created, and so were lists of women directors and screenwriters. I love how intuitively (and almost effortlessly) social media was used here to increase the presence of female filmmakers. Maybe a film exec will be on twitter. Maybe a film exec will see one of the tweets. But even if they don’t, the issue has now become more accessible to the public and the pressure is on. Like with the Indiewire graphic, people know about the underrepresentation of women in film, but also amazing women directors and screenwriters to support. Their work receives more attention from everyone.

And then there’s the mentorship program! According to Variety, the total period of instruction will be a little bit under a year for the twenty members who will also be able to produce a short film at the end. That’s great, because that means more opportunity for women and more women-directed projects.

I hope this is a sign that things are getting better. Generally, the Internet and television programs seem more open to women as directors/producers/writers (I hope I’m not grossly generalizing). There’s Netflix’s Orange is the New Black, which also explores intersectionality. There’s the other “equalizing” effect of the Internet, in which people don’t need agents or contracts or whatever else to share their work. And on television (ok maybe I’m grossly generalizing) there’s Lena Dunham’s Girls. But film is important and people watch films and discuss them too.

I don’t think there’s a neat way for me to end this blog post, so I’ll make a mini list of female directors and screenwriters I love.

Sofia Coppola! Lisa Cholodenko! Mary Harron! Elizabeth Sarnoff! And Ava DuVernay!

The Unspeakable Things Have Been Spoken

Author:

By Sophia Simon-Bashall

unspeakable

Laurie Penny. If you’ve not heard the name before, it’s about time you paid attention. I’m a little biased perhaps, as Penny is nothing short of a hero to me. But honestly, she’s great. She’s recently released a book in the U.K., to be released in the U.S. in September. It’s called ‘Unspeakable Things’, and hell, she talks about exactly what girls are told not to. If you’re looking for an easy going, ‘yes you can be a feminist, love pink, wear false eyelashes and shave your legs’ book, this is not for you. Laurie Penny in general, is probably not for you. She is not interested in sugar-coating this movement, making it appealing to the masses. In her eyes, its appeal should just be a given. Frankly, she thinks this kind of lipstick feminism is rather silly. For her, it’s about the nitty-gritty, the things that nobody likes to talk about. But she’s talking about them, and she certainly won’t be silenced any time soon.

Penny interlinks serious analysis of a range of issues, with the ways in which she has personally been affected, making for a very interesting and thought-provoking read. However, the personal side is no sob story – it’s a cold, slightly bitter narrative, at times, relaying the harsh truths of eating disorders, rape culture, and more. There’s no sugar coating, it’s completely honest. And yet, she’s not claiming to speak for everyone, which is an irritatingly common mistake in discussion of these topics. In fact, she regularly stresses otherwise, pointing out that she is a white, middle-class woman; therefore privileged, and unable to tell every woman’s point of view. It is often assumed that feminist texts speak for all women, and often writers assume this ‘voice of the people’ stance. It is incredibly refreshing that Laurie Penny openly refutes this.

The book is in many ways a rant. It is an intense outlet of anger about the world; about neoliberal capitalism; about patriarchal constraints; about transphobia; about white/male/heterosexual/cis-gender/middle-class privileges – you name it, Penny is probably pissed off about it. But it’s still very eloquently written, aside from the regular effing and blinding. She covers ground such as mental illness, single motherhood and abortion. It’s true, these are all topics covered before, but here is the view of a young woman – a view from someone of this generation. However, more importantly, she attacks things barely touched upon before like issues with modern feminism, cybersexism, and uniquely, men’s issues. But it’s not what you think. The chapter on guys is actually the best part of the book. If you only read one part when you pick it up in the bookshop, make it the ‘Lost Boys’ chapter. It’s genuinely eye-opening, and you won’t regret it.

Her unrelenting wit and her ingenious prose style make this book brilliant. Though it was a moving and engrossing read, there were moments when I found myself laughing out loud, because, yes, Laurie Penny kicks patriarchal ass. It is full of dry humour – fitting for the mood of the book and the nature of the issues discussed. Highlights include; “those who are so eager for women and girls to go back to the kitchen might think again… you can plan a lot of damage from a kitchen. It’s also where the knives are kept” and “Having it all now means having a career, kids, a husband, a decent blow-dry – and that’s it.” And that’s only in the introduction.

I’m not saying I agree with every little detail in the book. In fact, there were several points made that I frowned at and found myself strongly disagreeing. But that doesn’t mean I don’t value what’s said – quite the opposite. It’s a reminder that we don’t all have to agree on everything. It’s a necessary aspect of this movement – differing opinions, challenging others and being challenged, that’s how the Suffragettes arose! What matters is that, at the very core, we are united in ideas and are willing to fight for social change. This is how we will make equality a reality.

Hey there!

We are Powered By Girl. We're young women who write for young women. We do it because we're fed up of media sexism, racism, transphobia and discrimination in all its forms. We create the alternative content that we want to see. Please have a look at our stuff, and join us!

Sign up to get our blogs in your inbox!